William Wareham

Born in Ohio, Wareham attended the Philadelphia School of Art where he received his BFA. At UC Berkeley he received both an MA and MFA. He was a recipient of an NEA grant in 1974 and the Eisner Prize for Sculpture at UC Berkeley in 1968 and 1969. He assisted Peter Volkos for five years and Mark di Suvero for six. Other influences can be traced to Antony Caro and David Smith. Wareham was the first Artist in Residence at the Norcal Solid Waste Systems facility in San Francisco. Since then recycled steel has been used as a primary material in many of his sculptures. He has exhibited widely throughout California, including solo exhibits at the Oakland Museum Sculpture Court, the Pacific Heritage Museum in San Francisco, and in Nevada, Hawaii, Illinois and New Jersey. The Voigt Family Sculpture foundation installed his major sculpture Lackawanna on the Santa Rosa Junior College campus and a bench on the Foss Creek Pathway. He has had work on display as part of the City of Santa Rosa public art sculpture exhibition and in Cloverdale. He moved his studio from the Hunter’s Point Shipyards in San Francisco when he bought property in Montague, California.

William Wareham

William Wareham

 

William Wareham, We Two

We Two

A sculpture opportunity that could be something meaningful to our memory of Al Vogt is something of which I wanted to be a part.  He was a generous and thoughtful friend with a disposition that always put one at ease; his sense of humor showing deep intelligence and understanding of how things are.

How to address that in a sculpture is a challenge.  The simplicity of forms, two quarter sphere wedges, acknowledges his and my friendship. The polygon at the apex is his ascendance with a golden glow. Finally, the three white parallel fence bars address the rural life where we each found necessary for happiness.  I think it symbolically says enough.  The finished sculpture had to be BIG, not diminutive, speaking to the generous life Al lived. I wanted the sculpture to appear light as if it is lifting up using a minimal of structural means to active this. I think Al understood engineering feats like this!

Long Bench, William Wareham