Jann Nunn

Oakland-based artist Jann Nunn has exhibited, lectured and held residencies internationally since 1987 including England, Korea, Germany and throughout the United States. Her work is represented in several public and numerous private collections including di Rosa Preserve, Stadt-Sparkasse, and Common Ground’s New Milestone Project. Nunn has created several large-scale works in public places, notably a multi-genocidal memorial on the grounds of Sonoma State University where she is Professor of Sculpture. Jann’s constructions often involve much research, carefully weighing content with material selection and presentation methods along with gut instinct – a marriage of head and heart – resulting in forms from sculpture and installation to works on paper and ranging in scale from monumental to minute. Jann studied art at University of Alaska Anchorage, Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture in Maine, and received an MFA in Sculpture from San Francisco Art Institute.

Jann Nunn
Jann Nunn
 

Jann Nunn, Sometimes I See You in My Dreams

Sometimes I See You in My Dream

I designed Sometimes I See You in My Dream as a visual paean to the memory of Al Voigt. With this work, I want to evoke a sense of the vast and profound effect his intellect, genius and humanity had on people from various walks of life. I chose the metaphor of the ripple to subtly portray Al’s magnanimous influence, the wide spread consequences of how he lived his life and touched the lives of so many people. For Al, relationships with the people he loved were paramount.

Like a pebble tossed into a pond or endless flowing tears, an object contacting a liquid surface creates ripples. Sometimes I See You in My Dream addresses not only the sense of loss and memory but also of joy and gratitude.

The sculpture can be seen in a variety of ways. Upon approach, the horizontal reflective edges of the stainless steel give the impression of gentle ripples upon the surface of an invisible body of water. The work, set into a depression in the landscape, is seen from the roadway at roughly eye-level. As viewers approach the sculpture, they are engulfed beneath the canopy of ripples hovering ten feet overhead.  Against the sky, it elicits the feeling of being underwater or subsumed by its magnitude. In another setting, the sculpture can be experienced by looking down upon the top of the ripples.